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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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100 years ago in Spokane

Unemployment was rife in Spokane, causing the head of the city’s social services bureau to beg the mayor to immediately launch public works projects, the Spokane Daily Chronicle reported on Jan. 5, 1921.  (Spokesman-Review archives)
Unemployment was rife in Spokane, causing the head of the city’s social services bureau to beg the mayor to immediately launch public works projects, the Spokane Daily Chronicle reported on Jan. 5, 1921. (Spokesman-Review archives)
By Jim Kershner The Spokesman-Review

Unemployment was rife in Spokane, causing the head of the city’s social services bureau to beg the mayor to immediately launch public works projects.

The agency said that there were 425 men registered at the city’s employment office, but no work was available. The most common refrain among these men was, “I don’t want charity – I want work.”

“Such men are good, honest and industrious men and they will work at anything whatsoever when given the opportunity,” said the head of the agency. ” … I beg to further suggest that the sewer work on the south side might be done by day labor under the direction of the city, instead of by contract, and thus afford employment with a minimum of delay.”

This was by no means a problem unique to Spokane. Labor officials reported that 2.3 million men were out of work in the U.S., the result of the “greatest industrial slump since the money panic of 1907.”

From the auto beat: The head of the Eastern Washington Highway Association demanded that hit-and-run drivers, who mowed down pedestrians, be prosecuted to the full extent of the law.

He called such drivers “lawless and cowardly” and he called the crime “unpardonable.” His request was prompted by two recent incidents in Spokane in which female pedestrians were struck by autos and dragged by drivers attempting to flee.

Also on this date

(From the Associated Press)

1998: Sonny Bono, the 1960s pop star, was killed when he struck a tree while skiing at the Heavenly Ski Resort on the Nevada-California state line; he was 62.

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