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Eye On Boise

9th Circuit rejects Otter’s bid for initial en banc review in gay marriage case

The 9th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals has rejected, without comment, Gov. Butch Otter’s request for Idaho’s same-sex marriage case to go directly to a full 11-judge panel of the court, rather than the usual three-judge panel. Otter made the request in July, saying a full-court review by the appellate court rather than a smaller panel would enhance the “perception of the legitimacy of this court’s resolution.” It’s highly unusual for such a request to be granted.

Today, the 9th Circuit issued a 10-word order, saying only, “Appellant Otter’s petition for initial hearing en banc is denied.”

U.S. Magistrate Judge Candy Dale overturned the Idaho Constitution’s ban on same-sex marriage in May, saying it violated the U.S. Constitution’s guarantees of equal protection and due process. The state is now appealing her ruling to the 9th Circuit; the appeals court has set arguments for Sept. 8.

Yates names new Idaho GOP exec director, David Johnston

David Johnston has been named the new executive director of the Idaho Republican Party, Idaho GOP Chairman Steve Yates announced today. Johnston most recently worked as an energy specialist for the governor’s Office of Energy Resources; he’s worked on campaigns and for the Legislature, has a degree in political science from BSU, and served four years on active duty in the Marine Corps. Johnson grew up in Lava Hot Springs.

“I am thrilled to have someone of David’s caliber fill this critical role,” Yates said in a statement. “He has a record of hard work, service, and attention to detail that will be a major asset to the party and all of its members.”

Report: Future Idaho school students to be poorer, more urban, more diverse

A new study commissioned by the Idaho Charter School Network and funded by a grant from the Albertson Foundation projects that Idaho’s school student population will see significant demographic changes in the next five years, becoming increasingly urban, more racially diverse and poorer. “These trends will present challenges for many districts,” the study finds. “Many rural districts will continue to lose students while more urban districts will struggle to meet growing enrollments.”

The study is aimed in part at identifying where the best opportunities are for charter schools in the state, but Terry Ryan, president of the Idaho Charter School Network, said the data also has implications for education in the state more broadly. “Idaho is changing, and how it does schooling needs to adapt if the state’s schools are to adjust to the changing needs of its children and families,” he said.

Idaho’s Hispanic student population is projected to be its fastest-growing portion, while the non-Hispanic white student population is projected to decline. Meanwhile, “Idaho is expected to see net growth in lower income households and net declines in households with incomes above $50,000,” the report says. It also documents the increasing reliance of school districts on voter-approved local tax override levies – an option that’s not available to charter schools. Overall, the report concludes that the current state school funding system is “not well aligned with the coming demands of an increasingly urban, more diverse and poorer student population. The report, entitled “Shifting Sands,” is online here.

Luna’s new job to start Jan. 1

Idaho state schools chief Tom Luna will start his new job as a vice president with Project Lead the Way, a national education non-profit, on Jan. 1, 2015, according to the project’s spokeswoman, Jennifer Cahill. The non-profit, which provides STEM curriculum and training to schools nationwide, is based in Indianapolis, but Cahill said it has more than 50 “remote team members” who work from home in their home states; that’s what Luna will do as well. Luna will oversee four regional directors who will live and work in their regions, and all will travel as needed to Indianapolis.

Luna’s position – and the team he’ll head – is a new one for the firm, Cahill said; it won’t involve any direct lobbying. Instead, it’ll be focused on policy, advocacy and research, aimed at identifying growth opportunities and barriers to growth for the group’s programs. The new team, she said, will develop “general policy concepts and advance those through informational pieces.”

While Project Lead the Way began as a foundation-funded nonprofit, it no longer receives foundation funding, Cahill said, instead operating on the fees that schools pay to participate in the programs, which vary from $750 to $3,000 a year. In addition, it has numerous corporate partners, who give grants directly to the schools to help with the cost of the program; they include Chevron, Lockheed-Martin, Cargill, Toyota, General Motors, Dow Chemical, Amgen and more.

Luna will join national STEM nonprofit as VP after his term as state schools chief is up

Idaho state Superintendent of Schools Tom Luna has accepted a new job with a national education non-profit focused on science and technology courses and teacher training, starting in early 2015. Luna will be vice president of policy, advocacy and research for Project Lead the Way, a provider of STEM programs and teacher training; you can read my full story here at spokesman.com.

“My focus and priority today continues to be the children of Idaho,” Luna said in a statement. “There are several major initiatives that need continued attention such as teacher quality and pay through a new tiered system of licensure and a well-funded career ladder, technology implementation to increase access throughout Idaho, dual credit opportunities for all high school students and ensuring students are reading proficiently by the time they exit third grade. These are my highest priorities as I finish my second-term as state superintendent of public instruction.”

Luna will be based in Idaho in his new job, according to his office. “It was really important to Superintendent Luna that he gets to stay in Idaho,” said spokesman Brady Moore. Luna will be “creating his own team” for Project Lead the Way, Moore said.

In his new job, Luna will oversee a team focused on federal, state, and local policies, as well as research initiatives that support STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) growth across the United States. He’ll oversee four regional directors and a team of policy analysts and researchers.

According to its website, Project Lead the Way is the leading provider of K-12 STEM programs to schools in the United States, serving more than 5,000 elementary, middle and high schools in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. It started in 1986 in upstate New York when high school teacher Richard Blais began offering pre-engineering and digital electronics classes to his students; he received support from the Liebich family’s Charitable Leadership Foundation in 1997 to expand the high school engineering program to 12 schools in upstate New York, and it grew from there.

Asked if the organization currently does business with the state Department of Education, Moore said, “Currently Project Lead the Way does not contract with Idaho at the state department level. They may do some work with schools independently, but on a statewide level, we haven’t worked with them at all, and we will continue to not work with them.”

Idaho Education News has a full report here, including these details: Project Lead the Way curriculum is currently offered in Boise, Nampa, Meridian, Kuna, Caldwell and Fremont school districts; and Idaho’s Division of Professional-Technical Education website encourages teachers to offer the nonprofit’s programs. Annual fees range from $750-$3,000 per school; the organization also has corporate sponsors.

New GOP Chair Yates: ‘We ought to be able to work out our differences’

New Idaho GOP Chairman Steve Yates has been starting from scratch at the Idaho GOP office, where the last remaining employee when he took over – recently hired party Executive Director Judy Gowen, who was brought in by former Chairman Barry Peterson – left shortly after the Aug. 2 meeting at which Yates was elected chairman.

“She seemed to be a very qualified and good person,” Yates said of Gowen, former political director for Sen. Russ Fulcher’s unsuccessful primary challenge to GOP Gov. Butch Otter. “I had a conversation with her very soon after the Aug. 2 meeting, and she let me know that she preferred to go back to school. She did not seek to be a candidate for executive director going forward.” Yates said he’s made a selection for a new executive director and is just awaiting executive committee approval. “We’re also now anxiously working through a process to identify a finance chairman that can help field a team that works on trying to breathe some oxygen into the effort that we have for the November (election) cycle,” he said.

After the party’s state convention failed to elect leaders over the summer amid a bitter intra-party divide, Peterson sued, claiming he still was chairman. A judge said no, prompting the election of Yates Aug. 2. “I have a reasonable amount of experience dealing with things that can be hashed out in the situation room in the West Wing, or in territorial disputes abroad,” said Yates, a former aide to Vice President Dick Cheney who moved to Idaho Falls in 2011. “I have to believe that whatever our disagreements may be within the party, less is at stake … and that we ought to be able to work out our differences.”

He said, “First priority is to build up a capacity and execute a plan that supports all our nominees through the November cycle with the things the party usually does – absentee ballots, get-out-the-vote efforts, field offices and things they can do to help all the candidates. We’re beginning the efforts to liaise with all the campaigns.” Yates said after the party gets through the November election, “We’ve got longer-term issues to deal with by way of rules and processes that led to where we ended up this year.” He said he’s heard from lots of Republicans who felt that party rules weren’t fairly applied; new rules and processes can address that before 2016, he said. But for now, “In the closing months of the election cycle, people need to be focused on the work.”

Later, he said, “perhaps they’ll have … time to decide how much they like the person standing next to them.”

“We’ve certainly got our work cut out for us,” he said, “in the sense that we’re amping up as a state party midway through an election.” I spoke with Yates yesterday; the Idaho Statesman also published a profile of Yates in today’s paper by reporter Sven Berg. It’s online here.

Three Treasure Valley businesses agree to cease Idaho operations in consumer protection case

Owners of three businesses that duped Idahoans on everything from satellite TV systems to vendor spaces at events to fake college credits have agreed to cease all operations in Idaho, Attorney General Lawrence Wasden announced today, under agreements with the attorney general's Consumer Protection Division. The three are Geo Marketing, LLC, of Boise; Kasey Thompson, of Boise, and Philip Braun, owner of the bankrupt Caldwell-based Canyon College of Idaho, Inc. Click below for Wasden's full announcement.

Labrador on this summer’s GOP convention: ‘At least I tried to fix the problem’ Edit

Looking back on this summer’s tumultuous Idaho Republican Party convention, which he chaired, 1st District GOP Congressman Raul Labrador says he’s not sorry he stepped in, even though the confab ended in chaos, without any votes on leaders, resolutions or the party platform as two wings of the party fiercely opposed each other. “I think what I keep reminding people is that at least I tried to fix the problem that we had,” Labrador said. “One of my favorite quotes is from Teddy Roosevelt about the man in the arena. I think sometimes politicians are afraid of getting right in the middle of something because they’re so worried about what happens to them politically. I actually wanted to solve the divide that existed in the party.”

Labrador noted that he spent five hours the night before the convention reached its climax trying to bring both sides to a compromise. “It was rejected, and I still don’t understand why it was rejected, but there’s nothing I could do about that,” he said. “The easy thing for me would have been to say, ‘Hey, I’m running for majority leader of the House, I should walk away from this so I don’t have anything fall on me.’ I think that would be the chicken way out, and I don’t do that.”

Now that the party, after a failed lawsuit from the former party chairman, has chosen a new chairman in newcomer Steve Yates, Labrador said, “I’m very impressed with him. Maybe he’s exactly what we needed – somebody who wasn’t really part of either camp so he can try to unify. I know that’s been his message, and I’m wholly supportive of him. And I want to help him in any way I can. But I would’ve been supportive of anybody who came out of that process.”

Here’s the quote Labrador referenced, from a speech Roosevelt gave at the Sorbonne in Paris in 1910:

“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.” 

Labrador on Popkey: ‘He knows what’s happened here in Idaho, what has been tried, what hasn’t’

Idaho 1st District Congressman Raul Labrador, asked today why he decided to recruit and hire longtime Idaho Statesman political reporter Dan Popkey to be his new press secretary, said, “The main reason is I wanted to have a better relationship with the Idaho media. I think I’ve always had a pretty good relationship, but it seemed like we could always improve. And I just, when I thought about who would be the best person to actually have a relationship with the Idaho media, somebody like Dan Popkey came to mind.” He added, “I think he was pretty shocked. And then he thought about it, and he thought it wasn’t a bad idea.”

Said Labrador, “I thought it was a pretty good move. … I respect the knowledge – he’s almost like an encyclopedia, and I’ve always respected that about him. He knows what’s happened here in Idaho, what has been tried and what hasn’t been tried.”

Popkey wasn’t with the congressman when I spoke with him today, incidentally, as he’s on vacation. Asked how that could be when he just started his new job two weeks ago, Labrador said it was a long-planned family commitment that was taken into account when he hired Popkey. “It’s how I would treat any employee,” he said.

Crapo says he’ll seek another term

Here’s a news item from the Associated Press: LEWISTON, Idaho (AP) — U.S. Sen. Mike Crapo says he will seek re-election in 2016. In making the announcement Friday in Lewiston, the 63-year-old Republican says he's committed to resolving a number of critical issues to the country. The Lewiston Tribune reports (http://bit.ly/XqzcMO ) that Crapo was elected to the Senate in 1998 to succeed Sen. Dirk Kempthorne. He is serving the fourth year of his third term and is ranked 39th in seniority in the Senate. A member of the minority party in the Senate, Crapo is the ranking member of the Senate's Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee, and serves on the Budget and Environment, Public Works, Indian Affairs and Finance committees. There had been speculation by some political observers that Crapo would retire from the Senate after his current term.

Colorful former Idaho Congressman George Hansen dies at 83

Colorful former Idaho Congressman George Hansen, who served seven terms in the U.S. House, ran unsuccessfully for the Senate three times, and also served time in federal prison, died Thursday in a Pocatello hospital at the age of 83. Idaho Statesman reporter Rocky Barker has a full report here. Hansen is survived by five children, 10 grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

NIFC warns folks to keep unauthorized drones away from wildfires

The National Interagency Fire Center says folks flying unauthorized drones near wildfires are getting in firefighters’ way, and they’re asking the drone operators to cut it out. Unauthorized drones “could cause serious injury or death to firefighters on the ground,” NIFC warns today. “They could also have midair collisions with airtankers, helicopters, and other aircraft engaged in wildfire suppression missions.” You can read my full story here at spokesman.com.

There have been at least three instances this year of unauthorized drone flights near a wildfire zone in violation of temporary flight restrictions, which typically are imposed around wildfires and require permission from fire managers to enter the airspace. Some apparently were taking video or collecting data on the fires. But Aitor Bidaburu, chair of the National Multi-Agency Coordinating Group at NIFC, said people shouldn’t fly drones near wildfires whether or not formal flight restrictions have been declared in effect. The presence of an unauthorized drone could prompt fire managers to suspend aerial suppression efforts until they’re sure it’s gone, disrupting firefighting, he said.

Anyone determined to have interfered with wildfire suppression efforts could be subject to civil penalties and potentially criminal prosecution.

State Board backs new tiered licensing system for teachers, opens it for public comments

Idaho’s state Board of Education has voted unanimously to give preliminary approval to a new tiered certification system for teachers, opening the way for a public comment period and public hearing before final consideration of the rule in November. The new way of approaching teacher certification and licensing was developed as part of the governor’s education task force’s 20 recommendations for improving education in the state; the new licensing system would be tied to a new teacher pay system that would sharply increase Idaho teacher pay.

“This is a sea change in how we handle the certification of Idaho teachers,” said state Board President Emma Atchley.

However, the Idaho Education Association has opposed a key aspect of the new rule, Idaho Education News reports, arguing that a teacher’s license or certificate should not be dependent on educator evaluations performed at the local level. EdNews reporter Clark Corbin reports that IEA members have opposed the evaluations rule in committee meetings, but no one spoke against it as the state board considered it on Thursday.

Corbin reports that the new system essentially calls for two tiers of teacher certification. The first is a three-year, non-renewable residency certificate for teachers just starting out in the profession. The second is a professional certificate for teachers who have more than three years of experience and meet eligibility, student growth and performance standards. Within the professional tier, there are standard and master professional certificates. There’s also a contingent professional certificate for teachers who don’t meet all renewal requirements, and an interim certificate for teachers moving to Idaho from elsewhere. You can read Corbin’s full report here, and see the full state board rule here.

Wolf derby group seeks 5-year special permit

Here’s a news item from the Associated Press: KETCHUM, Idaho (AP) — Organizers of a disputed predator derby aimed at killing wolves in central Idaho are asking for a five-year permit to hold the contest. The Idaho Mountain Express reports (http://bit.ly/1nW7xbv) in a story on Thursday that the group called Idaho for Wildlife applied with the Bureau of Land Management for a special recreation permit. The hunt went ahead last year after a U.S. District Court ruled against an environmental group that filed a lawsuit to stop the event. Organizers say that last year more than 230 participants killed 21 coyotes but no wolves near Salmon. Organizers have said they're seeking to publicize wolves' impact on local elk herds and potential disease risks. The BLM is examining the application as part of a process that will include a public comment period.

Balukoff asks IACI board to take down ‘appalling’ attack website

A.J. Balukoff, Democratic candidate for governor of Idaho, has sent a letter to the board of the Idaho Association of Commerce and Industry, the business lobbying group whose PAC has launched an attack campaign against him including a website dubbed “LiberalAJ.com,” asking the business leaders to take down the website. Balukoff wrote, “This website is filled with lies and gross misrepresentations in a transparent attempt to mislead voters. It demonstrates an appalling lack of integrity.” He cited the Rotary Club’s “four-way test,” saying he uses it as an “ethical guide.” The test asks: “Is it the truth? Is it fair to all concerned? Will it build goodwill and better friendships? Will it be beneficial to all concerned?”

Mike Reynoldson, IACI board member, immediate past chairman of the board and director of government affairs for Micron Technology, said he stands by the “LiberalAJ” website. Asked his reaction to Balukoff’s letter, Reynoldson said, “First-time candidate who maybe isn’t all that used to the political process. Obviously he’s upset that the website points out his positions, and so he’s trying to detract from that by making this request.”

Reynoldson said many of the “LiberalAJ” site’s claims point back to information Balukoff had posted on his own campaign website. For example, under the heading “Embracing Obamacare,” the site states, “A.J. supports Obamacare and its disastrous policies saying, ‘rather than calling for its repeal, I would prefer to work with it.’ Idahoans know that a federal government ‘solution’ isn’t what we need. We can’t afford a governor who embraces Obama and his failed healthcare policies. SOURCE: AJforIdaho.com/faq.” Next to the item is a picture of Balukoff with a picture of Obama super-imposed next to him.

Balukoff’s list of 23 “frequently asked questions” on his website includes, “What do you think about the Affordable Care Act?” His response, in part, says, “The Affordable Care Act is far from perfect, and it is not what I would have recommended. But rather than calling for its repeal, I would prefer to work with it and try to amend the parts of the law that are problematic. The problems in the law could be resolved through cooperation and compromise. Small businesses with few employees have a difficult time providing affordable health insurance for their employees, especially when one or two employees have a history of medical problems. The insurance premiums are high because the risk pool is small. This problem is fixed by the employees joining a larger risk pool, which is exactly what the state’s existing health insurance exchange provides—the opportunity to join a larger risk pool in an Idaho-run health insurance exchange rather than the federal exchange.”

Both IACI and GOP Gov. Butch Otter, whom Balukoff is challenging, supported the state-run insurance exchange, which Otter championed. But Reynoldson said, “His position and IACI’s position are different.”

You can see Balukoff’s website here, and IACI’s attack site here, which is headed, “A.J. Balukoff, YOU’RE A LIBERAL.”

Medicaid redesign group backs accepting federal funds for contracted health plans, on 10-3 vote

Gov. Butch Otter’s Medicaid Redesign Work Group met all day today, and at the end, voted 10-3 in favor of accepting federal Medicaid expansion money to cover low-income uninsured Idahoans with contracted health plans focused on primary care and prevention; you can read my full story here at spokesman.com. Sen. Steven Thayn, R-Emmett, who cast one of the three “no” votes along with Reps. Mike Moyle, R-Star, and Tom Loertscher, R-Iona, said while he opposed the motion, he liked that the group included plans for a pilot program in using existing catastrophic care fund money to provide direct primary care to patients.

Thayn said for him, there are still unanswered questions, including how much federal authorities will let Idaho vary from regular Medicaid rules in its plan.  “That’s probably the biggest piece: How’s it going to be different than regular Medicaid?” he asked. “Because we don’t necessarily want, and I think the task force agreed with this, to expand the current Medicaid plan just the way it is.”

The group heard a full day of presentations, including consultants’ analyses, and presentations on “special gap populations” that are now missing out on coverage, including veterans, the disabled, people with mental illness and many with indigency claims. “There’s no question that something needs to be done,” Thayn said. “Do we need federal money to do it? Could we incorporate that into some other ideas? Those are all debate points, I guess.”

States had the option of accepting millions in federal funds to cover those who make too much to qualify for Medicaid, but not enough to qualify for health insurance subsidies through insurance exchanges. Idaho has repeatedly delayed its decision, while Washington accepted the money and expanded coverage. An earlier state task force that Otter convened voted overwhelmingly in favor of expansion, but the governor proposed no legislation on that last year.

Among the other options the working group considered today were sticking  with the status quo; accepting the federal money but using it to buy private insurance along the lines of what Arkansas has done; and providing direct primary care services to patients with the existing catastrophic fund, which is 100 percent funded by the state and local property taxes. There's more info here about today's meeting.

Thayn said, “Can we craft it in such a way that it can win conservative legislators’ support? … I’m going to work on that a little bit and come up with some ideas. I don’t know if it’ll be accomplished or not.”

Corey Surber of St. Alphonsus, who facilitated the working group, said its recommendation will be written up in a report and presented to Otter. The option the group voted for would cover more than 100,000 Idahoans who now lack health insurance, and would save state and local taxpayers an estimated $43.9 million in fiscal year 2016 if lawmakers approved it in their 2015 session.

State tax revenues slightly below mark for July

Idaho state tax revenues in July came in slightly below the state’s newly revised forecasts, but 3.8 percent above July of the previous year. Revenues were 1.4 percent below the revised forecast of $244.3 million for the month. The forecast for fiscal year 2015, which began July 1, was revised downward $17 million by the state Division of Financial Management from the January forecast because of changing economic conditions suggesting lower anticipated sales tax growth in the coming year, now forecast at 5.9 percent, down from the previous 7.7 percent. You can see the state Division of Financial Management’s full monthly General Fund Revenue Report here.

Idaho declares Type 1 diabetes awareness day, at urging of 11-year-old with the disease

Thanks to the persistence of 11-year-old Carson Magee of Coeur d’Alene, Idaho has now officially proclaimed the second Monday of February as “Type 1 Diabetes Awareness Day,” and Carson’s helping plan an awareness event at the state Capitol that day. Carson was diagnosed with the disease at age 7, and as a result, he said he has to test his blood glucose and take shots six to eight times  a day. “I just want people to know the symptoms … and join our efforts for a cure,” Carson said at a ceremony today in the governor’s office, where First Lady Lori Otter formally signed the proclamation.

Lori Otter told the young man, “I commend you – not everybody is willing to step up and be part of the solution, and you are.” Type 1 Diabetes has no cure, and unlike Type 2 diabetes, is unrelated to diet or lifestyle; it formerly was called juvenile diabetes. According to JDRF, formerly known as the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system attacks and destroys insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas, rendering millions of Americans dependent on insulin injections and 24/7 vigilance to survive. 

Carson was a delegate to a national JDRF children’s congress on diabetes in Washington, D.C., and met another youngster who had persuaded Oklahoma to pass a similar proclamation. He decided to work toward one in Idaho, and noticed that Gov. Butch Otter and First Lady Lori Otter were going to be in his hometown for the Ironman Triathlon. That day, Carson rode his unicycle across the park to see the governor – he’s an accomplished unicyclist – and the governor and first lady and their staffers listened to Carson’s proposal with interest. “They took him very seriously,” said Carson’s mom, Fondra Magee. “They kind of surrounded him and got all the information about what he wanted to do.”

The Feb. 9 event in the state Capitol rotunda will include endocrinologists and families with members who have Type 1 diabetes who can answer questions people have about the disease and its symptoms. “I really think it will raise a lot of awareness,” Carson said.

Universities name programs they could cut to save money, re-prioritize

Idaho State University would eliminate its bachelor’s degrees in German and French. Boise State would do away with its Department of Bilingual Education, and could eliminate its College of Social Sciences and Public Affairs in a restructuring. The University of Idaho would do away with bachelor’s degrees in musical theater, American studies and medical technology. All are among proposals presented to the State Board of Education yesterday as part of a year-long required look at university programs aimed at cost-cutting, reports Boise State Public Radio’s Adam Cotterell; the schools looked at every program offered and judged each based on things like return on investment and demand. The state board required all the state’s four-year colleges and universities to examine and prioritize their programs; layoffs could result. Cotterell’s full report is online here.

Idaho readies for boost to endowment from cabin site auctions…

Idaho’s state endowment is expecting to make at least $30 million later this month from an auction of state-owned cabin sites on Priest Lake - an estimate state officials call “conservative” - and another $13 million from another auction at Payette Lake in December. Currently, proceeds from sales of state endowment land go into a Land Bank Fund for up to five years, where they can be used for other land acquisitions; after that time, they transfer to the permanent endowment.

A subcommittee of the Land Board looking at the issue reported today that the Land Bank currently has a $12.5 million balance, and while the Department of Lands is looking at possible purchases of timber land and road right-of-way, none of those purchases are likely to occur within the next four months. Funds in the Land Bank are invested by the state treasurer as part of the state’s idle pool, where they earn about 0.4 percent interest annually. But the permanent endowment fund last year made 18 percent in investment earnings.

“We certainly know that there will be some money coming into the Land Bank in amounts that really should be sent into the permanent funds,” said Idaho Secretary of State Ben Ysursa, who chairs the subcommittee. So the Land Board voted unanimously today to transfer the current $12.5 million balance from the Land Bank Fund to the permanent endowment. The board also voted to consider consultants’ analyses at its December meeting on how to handle future balances in the Land Bank fund and when to make transfers, including possibly limiting the land bank fund to $10 million, with all proceeds above that going directly to the permanent endowment fund.

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Betsy Z. Russell covers Idaho news from The Spokesman-Review's bureau in Boise.

Named best state-based political blog in Idaho for 2013 by The Fix

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