Outdoors

Fish and river runners are loving the abundance of water

Isabella McSpadden, 13, of West Valley City School, struggles to drive a sampling tube into the snow as students measure the snowpack at Mount Spokane with the help of the Natural Resources Conservation Service. (Dan Pelle)
Isabella McSpadden, 13, of West Valley City School, struggles to drive a sampling tube into the snow as students measure the snowpack at Mount Spokane with the help of the Natural Resources Conservation Service. (Dan Pelle)

RIVERS/LAKES —  This year's glut of precipitation — 180-192 percent of normal through out the region — is going a long way to recharge lakes, and the heavy snowpack — averaging more than 125 percent of normal throughout the region — has barely even started toward a serious runoff.

We're flush, so to speak. 

A cool, wet April left the snowpack in Much of Idaho virtually untouched, leaving the prospect of huge runoff in the Snake River basin and elswhere, according to the Twin Falls Times.

A Montana meteorologist is predicting “sensational runoff” and flooding favorite fishing streams such as the Bighole, according to the Great Falls Tribune.

However, big water years usually translate into big returns of salmon and steelhead when the young getting a boost downtream during spring return in a few years as adults.




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Rich Landers

Rich Landers’ Outdoors blog


Rich Landers writes and photographs stories for a wide range of outdoors coverage, including a Sunday feature section and a Thursday column. He also writes the Outdoors Blog.


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