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Monday, June 24, 2019  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Election Center


Mitt Romney

A candidate for President of the United States in the 2012 Washington General Election

Party: Republican

Age: 72

City: Boston, MA

Occupation: Venture capitalist; former Massachussetts governor

After a protracted primary battle, Romney won enough delegates to secure the nomination with a May 29 primary victory in Texas. Romney is the son of George Romney, an auto executive who became Michigan’s governor and made an unsuccessful White House run in 1968. The younger Romney says he is committed to seeing someone in the 2012 race “who understands the economy.” Romney has worked in the private sector for much of his career.

He served a single term as governor of Massachusetts, during which he worked with a Democratic legislature. He passed a statewide health insurance overhaul that President Barack Obama has called a model for his own national health care plan.

He has proven to be a fundraising powerhouse who survived a strong initial challenge from Rick Perry, then a surging Newt Gingrich, then a persistent Rick Santorum, only to watch his rivals flame out while he steadily won state contests.

Romney has already made one run for the White House, losing the 2008 GOP nomination to Sen. John McCain.

He has changed his views on issues vital to many conservatives, including abortion rights, gay rights and embryonic stem-cell research. Conservatives following the presidential race have still not settled on Romney, expressing preferences for candidates they see as being farther to the right.

He has been married for more than 40 years and has has five sons and 16 grandchildren.

Contact information


Election results

Washington vote totals in the national election

Candidate Votes Pct
Barack Obama (D) 1,620,432 55.80 %
Mitt Romney (R) 1,210,369 41.70 %
Gary Johnson (L) 37,732 1.30 %
Jill Stein (G) 18,316 0.63 %
Virgil Goode (C) 8,071 0.28 %
Rocky Anderson (J) 4,332 0.15 %
Peta Lindsay (S) 1,148 0.04 %
James Harris (S) 1,099 0.04 %

Details & headlines >>

Competitors

Gary Johnson

Libertarian

Virgil Goode

Constitution

Peta Lindsay

Socialism and Liberation

James Harris

Socialist Workers

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