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Wednesday, June 26, 2019  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Picture stories

Avista begins river work

As stream flows hit their seasonal lows in the Spokane River, Avista Utilities begins a to-do list of work on their dams and on the bed of the river. Many of the jobs are part of their 50-year relicensing agreement compiled by several stakeholder groups, including Indian tribes and environmental groups. On Wednesday, Aug. 17, surveyors and environmental consultants planned and prepared for the construction of weirs to direct river flows in a more aesthetically pleasing way.


Jesse Tinsley - The Spokesman-Review

Andrew Martinez, 6, leans out from a footbridge and watches a crew of three men from EES Consulting net fish from a deep rocky pool in the Spokane River north channel in downtown Spokane Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2011. EES is a contractor on the Avista Utilities project to install a series of concrete weirs, shaped and camouflaged to blend into the rocky landscape, that will reroute the flow pattern of water through river channels in downtown Spokane.


Jesse Tinsley - The Spokesman-Review

Brian Johnson, Tim Riley and Charles Sauvageau work to remove fish left in a deep hole on the Spokane River in downtown Spokane Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2011. The three work for EES Consulting, an environmental and engineering group.


Jesse Tinsley - The Spokesman-Review

A giant red band trout awaits relocation in a large tub of river water Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2011. Environmental consultants caught and relocated fish from holes that come close to drying out during the low flow period of late July through September. Work will begin soon on weirs to redirect the river’s flow.


Jesse Tinsley - The Spokesman-Review

A team of surveyors work on the mostly dry river bed Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2011 in the north channel of the Spokane River. The team is planning the placement of weirs, small shaped and camouflaged miniature dams that will divert the water in low flow periods for a more natural appearance.


Jesse Tinsley - The Spokesman-Review

Brian Johnson, Tim Riley and Charles Sauvageau use a device to stun and net fish left in a deep hole on the Spokane River Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2011. The three work for EES Consulting, an environmental and engineering group.


Jesse Tinsley - The Spokesman-Review

Brian Johnson tips a giant red band trout from his net into a bucket in a deep hole in the north channel of the Spokane River Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2011. Johnson works for EES Consulting, which is a contractor on the Avista Utilities project to install a series of concrete weirs, shaped and camouflaged to blend into the rocky landscape, that will reroute the flow pattern of water through river channels in downtown Spokane.

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