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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Hangman Creek video journey highlights troubles, solutions

Two Department of Ecology water quality modelers paddle a canoe, towing a testing probe, down Hangman Creek near The Creek at Qualchan Golf Course on April 28, 2016, as they cover the last few miles of water quality testing on the creek. (Jesse Tinsley / The Spokesman-Review)
Two Department of Ecology water quality modelers paddle a canoe, towing a testing probe, down Hangman Creek near The Creek at Qualchan Golf Course on April 28, 2016, as they cover the last few miles of water quality testing on the creek. (Jesse Tinsley / The Spokesman-Review)

STREAMS -- Hangman Creek used to produce 1,000 fish  a day for Nez Perce Indians during the salmon spawning runs.

Nowadays, the stream that merges with the Spokane River near downtown Spokane is a shadow of its former grandeur and hospitality to fish.

Even if the downstream dams were gone, Hangman Creek wouldn't invite many salmon and trout to spawn.

The Spokesman-Review reported on the issues in June.

This new video, produced locally and funded in part by the Washington Department of Ecology, launches a 10-minute journey down the stream to learn from experts what's gone wrong and what can be done to restore it for fish, wildlife and us.



Rich Landers
Rich Landers joined The Spokesman-Review in 1977. He is the Outdoors editor for the Sports Department writing and photographing stories about hiking, hunting, fishing, boating, conservation, nature and wildlife and related topics.

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