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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Denny Heck

A candidate for U.S. Representative, Congressional District 3 in the 2010 Washington Primary Election

Party: Democrat

City: Olympia, Washington

Education: Columbia River High School, Vancouver. Earned bachelor’s degree at Evergreen State College; did graduate work in public administration at Portland State University.

Political Experience: U.S. representative, serving Washington’s 10th Congressional District; former state legislator; former governor’s chief of staff.

Work experience: Co-founder of TVW and Integrated Learning Solutions.

Campaign financing: Raised about $900,000 as of Oct. 6, with maximum contributions of $4,000 coming from at least 43 donors, including the Washington Education Association, Tulalip and Nisqually tribes, Justice for All PAC and the Federation of State Employees.

Family: Married to Paula Frucci Heck. Has two adult children.

Contact information

Race Results

Candidate Votes Pct
Denny Heck (D) 51,895 31.40%
Jaime Herrera (R) 46,001 27.83%
David W. Hedrick (R) 22,621 13.69%
David B. Castillo (R) 19,995 12.10%
Cheryl Crist (D) 18,453 11.17%
Norma Jean Stevens (I) 6,309 3.82%

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