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Saturday, January 18, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Election Center

u 2012 Washington Primary



Latest news

Final faceoff

WASHINGTON – They are two of the largest parts of the federal government. They’re growing. And they’re heading toward financial problems that will touch tens of millions of Americans unless something changes. Medicare is the nation’s biggest buyer of health care, spending $550 billion last year to provide care for 48.7 million Americans. The problem is that the taxes paid by workers and employers to finance the program aren’t covering the full cost, and the government since 2008 has been drawing off its trust fund to make up the difference. Barring changes, the trust fund runs out in 12 years – 2024 – and the government would have to raise taxes or cut services.


Romney, Obama come out swinging

DENVER – In a showdown at close quarters, an aggressive Mitt Romney sparred with President Barack Obama in their first campaign debate Wednesday night over taxes, deficits and strong steps needed to create jobs in a sputtering national economy. “The status quo is not going to cut it,” declared the Republican challenger. Democrat Obama in turn accused his rival of seeking to “double down” on economic policies that actually led to the devastating national downturn four years ago – and of evasiveness when it came to prescriptions for tax changes, health care, Wall Street regulation and more.


Debate claims a bit sketchy

WASHINGTON – As President Barack Obama and Republican nominee Mitt Romney rhetorically sparred in Wednesday night’s televised debate, both candidates exhibited a propensity toward misstatements, falsehoods and exaggerations. From the economy to immigration, health care to military spending, both Romney and Obama sometimes played fast and loose with the facts. Here’s a look at some of what was said:


Voter registration drives adopting new methods

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Some organizations are turning to sophisticated data mining, direct mail, the Internet and other strategies to register voters typically underrepresented on the rolls, including young people and ethnic minorities. Others are simply targeting those who favor their political goals, such as conservative Christians.


Democrats target Romney

None


About the results: Primary elections in the state of Washington utilize a “Top 2” election system. The two candidates who receive the most votes in the Primary advance to the General Election, regardless of their party preference. Both “winning” candidates (and uncontested candidates) for a given race are denoted with green checkmark in the Spokesman-Review Election Center results. (Judicial races are an exception to this rule; see below.)

Supreme Court races: As per Washington election law, a judicial candidate who receives more than half of the votes in a primary election wins the seat and does not have to run in the November general election. A judicial race between only two candidates will therefore decide that race. If a candidate in a race of three or more people wins with over 50% of the vote, they will win the seat; otherwise, the top two candidates will advance to the November general election.



Latest news

Final faceoff

WASHINGTON – They are two of the largest parts of the federal government. They’re growing. And they’re heading toward financial problems that will touch tens of millions of Americans unless something changes. Medicare is the nation’s biggest buyer of health care, spending $550 billion last year to provide care for 48.7 million Americans. The problem is that the taxes paid by workers and employers to finance the program aren’t covering the full cost, and the government since 2008 has been drawing off its trust fund to make up the difference. Barring changes, the trust fund runs out in 12 years – 2024 – and the government would have to raise taxes or cut services.


Romney, Obama come out swinging

DENVER – In a showdown at close quarters, an aggressive Mitt Romney sparred with President Barack Obama in their first campaign debate Wednesday night over taxes, deficits and strong steps needed to create jobs in a sputtering national economy. “The status quo is not going to cut it,” declared the Republican challenger. Democrat Obama in turn accused his rival of seeking to “double down” on economic policies that actually led to the devastating national downturn four years ago – and of evasiveness when it came to prescriptions for tax changes, health care, Wall Street regulation and more.


Debate claims a bit sketchy

WASHINGTON – As President Barack Obama and Republican nominee Mitt Romney rhetorically sparred in Wednesday night’s televised debate, both candidates exhibited a propensity toward misstatements, falsehoods and exaggerations. From the economy to immigration, health care to military spending, both Romney and Obama sometimes played fast and loose with the facts. Here’s a look at some of what was said:


Voter registration drives adopting new methods

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Some organizations are turning to sophisticated data mining, direct mail, the Internet and other strategies to register voters typically underrepresented on the rolls, including young people and ethnic minorities. Others are simply targeting those who favor their political goals, such as conservative Christians.


Democrats target Romney

None