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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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James Hagengruber

This individual is no longer an employee with The Spokesman-Review.

Most Recent Stories

News >  Spokane

U.S. envoy talks about future for Iraq and himself

BAGHDAD – On a bright Sunday morning in March, Ambassador Ryan Crocker stepped out of a meeting with top embassy staff, adjusted his silk tie and greeted two visitors from his hometown under the rotunda of Saddam Hussein's former palace. Diplomats of his caliber – 37 years in the U.S. Foreign Service, ambassador postings to the world's toughest countries and now America's leading political problem-solver in Iraq – are typically known as masters of restraint and decorum. But Crocker's grin can only be described as dumbfounded.
News >  Idaho

Canfield trails get test run

A few decades back, Bruce Shadduck could climb the foothills of Canfield Mountain and stare out across a scattering of small farms, patches of forest and the huge green carpet of the Rathdrum Prairie. On Saturday, the retired teacher climbed the same slope and saw acres and acres of beige houses, winding ribbons of fresh asphalt and emerald green patches of fertilized lawn. But the land where he stood remained largely the same as when it was owned by his grandfather.
News >  Idaho

Lakebed will be ready just in time for spawning

BAYVIEW, Idaho – Just in the nick of time, Lake Pend Oreille's kokanee salmon should again have a clean bed of gravel for fall egg-laying. The gravel beds and tens of thousands of fertilized eggs were smothered by silt in April as a result of an expansion project at the Harborview Marina in Bayview. The work was illegal, officials say, and likely wiped out a large portion of this year's class of native kokanee on Lake Pend Oreille.

News >  Idaho

Hunting fatality probed

Officials have not yet decided whether to pursue criminal charges in connection with the late-afternoon shooting death Tuesday of a hunter near Bayview, according to a statement issued by Kootenai County sheriff's Capt. Ben Wolfinger. It was the second hunter death in as many days in North Idaho. On Monday, a St. Maries hunter was found dead. Officials believe the hunter slipped and accidentally shot himself in the chest.
News >  Idaho

County won”t interfere with adjudication process

Despite pressure from leaders of surrounding counties, Kootenai County commissioners rejected a proposal Tuesday that could have slowed or derailed the adjudication of water rights in North Idaho. "It's important to get the water adjudication going. It's going to benefit all the counties," Kootenai County Commissioner Todd Tondee said.
News >  Idaho

Easy food deadly for grizzlies

A picture might be worth a thousand words, but is it worth the life of one of the nation's rarest mammals? That's the question wildlife experts are asking after a 2-year-old Selkirk grizzly was shot by Idaho Fish and Game officials Oct. 4, when rubber bullets, noise-making shotgun shells and a live-trap relocation failed to keep the bear from returning to easy food sources in the tiny lakeside community of Nordman.
News >  Idaho

Project restores safe wetlands

CATALDO, Idaho – On Monday, the swans were swimming and feeding in the marsh. A couple of days later, they were sluggish and barely moving. By Friday, the swans were dead – victims of lead poisoning. The deaths happened a few years back, but the memory remains fresh for Anne Dailey, an environmental scientist with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
News >  Idaho

Marines proud of airport’s name

Although they're half a world away from Idaho, the Marine fighter pilots serving with the Black Sheep Squadron have been following efforts to rename the airfield at the Coeur d'Alene Airport after the squadron's legendary founder, Gregory "Pappy" Boyington. The airport was renamed Coeur d'Alene Airport/Pappy Boyington Field last month after Boyington, a fighter ace and Medal of Honor recipient who was born in Coeur d'Alene and went on to lead the Black Sheep Squadron during World War II.
News >  Spokane

White-water park worries some fish fans

A white-water park planned for downtown Spokane is prompting an undercurrent of anxiety over possible impacts to the river's remaining population of native fish. Although the park's designer insists fish will factor foremost in shaping and building the white-water play area, environmental advocates say the site is too close to some of the last, best remaining spawning grounds for redband trout.

More Stories By James Hagengruber