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Ok ‘Fine’ Some Nagging Little Problems Keep ‘One Fine Day’ Fine, But Not Great

Chris Hewitt St. Paul Pioneer Pr

The only woman who does not make a pass at New Yorker George Clooney in “One Fine Day” is the Statue of Liberty.

Chicks are constantly throwing themselves at him and saying things like, “I’m gentle, but brutal,” as the movie strains to convince us he’s gorgeous and charming, both of which we can see for ourselves. On the other hand, “One Fine Day” simply assumes that we will recognize how lovely and sardonically funny Michelle Pfeiffer is. Which we do.

The chemistry between these two is real, and they have some clever dialogue that explores a good idea: two busy people juggling careers and single parenthood. “One Fine Day” shows how the scheduling of adult lives becomes controlled by the schedules of children. Ultimately, kids come first for Pfeiffer and Clooney, careers come second and, in one of the movie’s refreshingly realistic touches, romance comes never.

The people who made “One Fine Day” (Pfeiffer also produced) are clearly committed to telling the truth about the compromises we make for our children, which is admirable but not terribly funny. “One Fine Day” veers between uncomfortable naturalism and broad farce - something “The Goodbye Girl,” a movie that shares the same control-freak woman/irresponsible man romantic plot, avoided.

It also would have helped if they’d cast someone you believe as a father. Pfeiffer, who gets scared and miffed at all the right times, is terrific as a mom, but Clooney always seems more like an uncle than a dad. It’s a small thing, but there are lots of little, nagging, wrong details in “One Fine Day” and, over a course of the movie that peaks too early and goes on too long, they begin to add up.

MEMO: These 2 sidebars appeared with the story: 1. “One Fine Day” Locations: East Sprague, Lyons and Coeur d’Alene Cinemas Credits: Directed by Michael Hoffman, starring Michelle Pfeiffer and George Clooney Running time: 1:48 Rating: PG

2. OTHER VIEWS Here’s what other critics say about “One Fine Day:” Bob Thomas/Associated Press: Thank heaven for “Sleepless in Seattle.” Nora Ephron’s inspired movie demonstrated to other filmmakers that modern romance doesn’t have to begin in the bedroom. Audiences were enthralled, even though Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan didn’t even meet until the final reel. “One Fine Day” is the latest attraction to benefit from the revival of that great Hollywood art form, the romantic comedy. The formula remains evergreen - two attractive leads are thrown together by quirk; develop antipathies, even loathing; then, ultimately decide they have overreacted and are hopelessly in love. Michael H. Price/Fort Worth Star-Telegram: The children are a delight - real kids, who thankfully avoid playing it cute. Indeed, the only cute business on hand is the scene where Pfeiffer and Clooney “meet cute,” and from then on, director Michael Hoffman keeps this comedy of the heart cracking along at the pace of a good suspense picture.

The following fields overflowed: CREDIT = Chris Hewitt St. Paul Pioneer Press

These 2 sidebars appeared with the story: 1. “One Fine Day” Locations: East Sprague, Lyons and Coeur d’Alene Cinemas Credits: Directed by Michael Hoffman, starring Michelle Pfeiffer and George Clooney Running time: 1:48 Rating: PG

2. OTHER VIEWS Here’s what other critics say about “One Fine Day:” Bob Thomas/Associated Press: Thank heaven for “Sleepless in Seattle.” Nora Ephron’s inspired movie demonstrated to other filmmakers that modern romance doesn’t have to begin in the bedroom. Audiences were enthralled, even though Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan didn’t even meet until the final reel. “One Fine Day” is the latest attraction to benefit from the revival of that great Hollywood art form, the romantic comedy. The formula remains evergreen - two attractive leads are thrown together by quirk; develop antipathies, even loathing; then, ultimately decide they have overreacted and are hopelessly in love. Michael H. Price/Fort Worth Star-Telegram: The children are a delight - real kids, who thankfully avoid playing it cute. Indeed, the only cute business on hand is the scene where Pfeiffer and Clooney “meet cute,” and from then on, director Michael Hoffman keeps this comedy of the heart cracking along at the pace of a good suspense picture.

The following fields overflowed: CREDIT = Chris Hewitt St. Paul Pioneer Press

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