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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Fish only does not balanced diet make

Peter Gott United Media

Dear Dr. Gott: I have a daughter, 50 years old, who eats only salmon. She eats very few vegetables and no poultry or meat. She feels that salmon is very healthy. I am worried about all the mercury that may be in the salmon. Her diet consists of black coffee for breakfast, a salad for lunch and lots of salmon for dinner. I don’t think this is healthful. I would appreciate your opinion. I am so worried about her.

Dear Reader: Recent studies have again confirmed that certain fish – notably swordfish and wild salmon – can have high mercury levels and, therefore, should be consumed sparingly.

I am more concerned that your daughter is not eating a balanced diet. If she is a nonmeat eater, she needs at least to increase her intake of grains, vegetables and fresh fruit.

But she is old enough to make her own decisions, so don’t nag her. Instead, show her my answer to your note and encourage her to make some appropriate dietary modifications.

To give you related information, I am sending you a copy of my Health Report “Calorie Wise Cooking.” Other readers who would like a copy should send a long, self-addressed, stamped envelope and $2 to Newsletter, P.O. Box 167, Wickliffe, OH 44092. Be sure to mention the title.

Dear Dr. Gott: Can you explain the difference between a hiatal hernia with acid reflux and GERD? My husband says that they are the same thing.

Dear Reader: Your husband is correct.

Often referred to by the shorter names “acid reflux” or simply “reflux,” gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common condition, usually in conjunction with a weakness of the ring of muscle (hiatal hernia) that prevents stomach acid from backwashing up into the delicate esophagus. GERD often causes cough, heartburn, gas and other annoying symptoms. The condition should be treated with drugs, such as Pepcid AC and others. If symptoms persist despite therapy, patients should seek out a gastroenterologist, because chronic reflux may lead to a premalignant condition known as Barrett’s esophagus.

The diagnosis of GERD is made during X-rays of the upper gastrointestinal tract or by endoscopy (viewing the esophageal and gastric linings through a fiber-optic tube).

To give you related information, I am sending you a copy of my Health Report “Hiatal Hernia.” Other readers who would like a copy should send a long, self-addressed, stamped envelope and $2 to Newsletter, P.O. Box 167, Wickliffe, OH 44092. Be sure to mention the title.

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