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Britons remember 7/7 transit bombings

52 commuters killed in ’05 al-Qaida attack

Britain’s Prince William walks to lay flowers during a service Tuesday for survivors and relatives of the victims to mark the 10-year anniversary of the 7/7 London attacks at the 7/7 memorial in Hyde Park in London. (Associated Press)
Britain’s Prince William walks to lay flowers during a service Tuesday for survivors and relatives of the victims to mark the 10-year anniversary of the 7/7 London attacks at the 7/7 memorial in Hyde Park in London. (Associated Press)
Ashley Chan Associated Press

LONDON – Britons paused in silence, laid flowers and lit candles Tuesday to mark the 10th anniversary of suicide bombings on London’s transit system in the worst terror attack on British soil and a day of pain seared into London’s collective memory.

Four British men inspired by al-Qaida blew themselves up on three London subway trains and a bus during the morning rush hour on July 7, 2005, killing 52 commuters and injuring more than 700. The memory of that morning remains raw in this country of 64 million.

Solemn ceremonies were held throughout the capital, starting at the memorial in London’s Hyde Park devoted to the victims. Prime Minister David Cameron and London Mayor Boris Johnson walked through the memorial’s 52 pillars – one for each victim – to lay wreaths.

At 8:50 a.m., the moment the attacks began, the park fell silent. Families of victims clutched flowers. Some in the crowd bowed their heads.

Survivor Sajda Mughal said the memories never really go away.

“(The ceremony) drew me back to the very same day, when I experienced the whole traumatic event being down there in the Piccadilly line, hearing those screams, people banging on the carriage,” she said. “And then, as I was watching the wreath being laid, I came back to 2015 and I thought ‘Well, I am alive, thank God I’m alive.’ But unfortunately, we’ve lost 52 lives.”

The families organized a service of their own later in the day, a chance for them to remember in a way of their choosing – with music, personal comments and a cup of tea. Prince William asked the families if he could attend, and sat quietly in the front row in solidarity with their grief.

The enduring pain of the day was evident in the tears of survivor Emma Craig, who was only 14 in 2005 when she was on her way to a work experience trip to a legal firm in east London.

“All of us lost our innocence on that day, our naivety, the thought that ‘something like that could never happen to me’ or even to London,” she said.

Trembling, she offered contrast in a day of speeches etched with defiance, delivering a harder truth. She said that while people will say “terrorism won’t break us,” Craig knew only too well that it isn’t so simple.

“The fact is it may not have broken London, but it did break some of us,” she said.

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