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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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100 years ago in Spokane: 2 found guilty of releasing ‘gas bombs’ in non-union theater

A Casino Theater manager told the court about the ill effects of the “gas bombs” (stink bombs) let loose in his theater by disgruntled union members, the Spokane Daily Chronicle reported on Nov. 25, 1921. Two defendants were found guilty on conspiracy charges and fined $75 and costs.  (Spokesman-Review archives)
A Casino Theater manager told the court about the ill effects of the “gas bombs” (stink bombs) let loose in his theater by disgruntled union members, the Spokane Daily Chronicle reported on Nov. 25, 1921. Two defendants were found guilty on conspiracy charges and fined $75 and costs. (Spokesman-Review archives)
By Jim Kershner The Spokesman-Review

A Casino Theater manager told the court about the ill effects of the “gas bombs” (stink bombs) let loose in his theater by disgruntled union members.

“It was the most terrible odor I ever smelled,” said the manager. “It brought tears to the eyes of everyone. Crowds would rush out of the theaters when the bombs were let off and no new ones would come in. … I smelled the odor when I was at Post and Riverside, a half-block from the Casino Theater.”

He testified that box office receipts plummeted during the days after the incident. That was the goal of the stink-bombers, who were attempting to cut attendance at nonunion theaters.

Two of the defendants were found guilty on conspiracy charges and fined $75 and costs. The alleged ringleader, known only as “Mr. Fischer of Seattle,” was still at large, but a warrant was issued for his arrest. The case against Eva Jury, whose confession solved the mystery, was continued for 60 days so she could testify against Mr. Fischer upon his apprehension.

Attempts by the defense to “shatter” Jury’s testimony were “without avail.”

From the North Idaho beat: The North Idaho Chamber of Commerce announced an ambitious new goal: To double the population of the region in 10 years.

The chamber pointed out that the region’s 10 counties were almost the size of New England, yet North Idaho’s population was only 110,000.

To achieve that goal, the chamber said it would be necessary to convert logged-off land to cultivation, reclaim swamp lands, build factories and revitalize the mining and lumbering industries.

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