February 1, 1998 in Sports

Use Your Browser To Break Through The Time Barrier

David Davidson Cox News Service
 

The best way to keep up - in real time - with a Winter Olympics halfway around the world is through the Internet. Because Nagano is 14 hours ahead of the Eastern time zone, most of CBS’ coverage will be tape-delayed.

And although “official” sites can be boring, the official Nagano site and a special site set up by the television network are the best bets for up-to-the-minute information as the action unfolds.

A number of options are available from many of the big sports sites, including CNNSI, ESPN’s SportsZone and Nandonet’s Sportserver.

All are currently providing comprehensive news stories daily and plan to apply the same energy to event coverage when the Olympic flame is ignited in Nagano:

http://www.nagano.olympic.org

http://www.winterolympics.com

http://www.cnnsi.com/olympics/events

http://www.espn.sportszone.com/olympics98/index.html

http://www.sportserver.com/newsroom/sports/oth/oly/feat/oly.html

For a shortcut to dozens of Olympic-related sites, try the spectacular Olympic Web. The brainchild of Atlantan Dave Rosselle, it offers links to virtually everything related to the Games, from organizations and history to athletes and media Web sites. This site has attracted nearly 1.6 million hits since it went online May 7, 1995 - a figure not lost on Barnes & Noble, the primary sponsor:

http://www.com-stock.com/dave/

Another good “unofficial” Olympic site is ZDNet’s “Your Internet Guide to the Winter Olympics.” It has sifted through various sites pertaining to individual sports and provides links to the best ones. It also has links to general Olympic sites, including the Atlanta Summer Games:

http://www.zdnet.com/yil/content /mag/9802/olympictoc.html

Multi-volumed encyclopedia sets may be nearly as extinct as dinosaurs, but the folks at Britannica are still heavily into the information business. They’ve come up with a very cool site for anyone following the Olympics. This site provides complete results of every Winter event since 1924, plus every Summer Games from their reincarnation in 1896 through Atlanta. Searches can be done by country or by an individual athlete’s performance, or users can create an automated search of Britannica’s super-sized database:

http://www.winter.eb.com

http://www.winter.eb.com/sports/index.html

The U.S. Olympic Committee site - “Live from Nagano” - offers plenty of great features. There are daily schedules of events in Nagano, rosters of every American team, an online store and “Winter Games 101,” which is everything you need to know about Olympic medalists, particularly Americans. “What Time Is It” gives the time of day for all U.S. time zones plus Nagano:

http://www.usoc.org

IBM has offered its considerable technological expertise to Nagano’s official site to help speed information, statistics and results to cyberheads worldwide. Big Blue also has set up a site so fans can send e-mail to a particular athlete or team, with the help of an animated penguin named Pudgy. No guarantee that e-mailers will get a response:

http://www. ibm.com/olympic/fanmail

Not to be left out in the cold, Coca-Cola Co. has established a site that features a virtual tour through Nagano. Miki is your cyberguide. The Torch Relay can be tracked, and the site offers a visit to the Pin Trading Center and a tour of the local Coke bottler:

http://www. cocacola.co.jp


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