Nation/World

Protest targets sheriff’s immigration crackdown

Sheriff Joe Arpaio talks Saturday during a news conference prior to a protest march in Phoenix.  (Associated Press)
Sheriff Joe Arpaio talks Saturday during a news conference prior to a protest march in Phoenix. (Associated Press)

PHOENIX – Thousands of immigrant rights advocates marched in front of a county jail in Phoenix on Saturday in a protest that was aimed at Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio’s immigration efforts and was marked by a clash between a small group of protesters and police officers.

Organizers say the protest was meant to show officials in Washington that Arpaio shouldn’t handle immigration enforcement, and that Congress and the Obama administration need to come up with a way for immigrant workers to come to the country legally.

The three-mile walk that started in a west Phoenix park ended by afternoon at the Durango Jail Complex, a collection of five jails, where officials played music, including a record by singer Linda Ronstadt, to drown out noise made by protesters. Ronstadt took part in Saturday’s protest.

Protesters chanted “Joe must go” as they approached the jail complex.

For his part, Arpaio said he wasn’t bothered by the protesters and that they should be directing their frustrations at Congress because it has the power to change America’s immigration laws.

The demonstration was peaceful until, police say, protesters near the end of the procession started throwing water bottles at officers. Phoenix police Lt. Pat Hofmann said officers used pepper spray as they tried to separate protesters from an officer who was trying to take away the bottles.

“Most regrettably, a nearby 2-year-old child was hit by some of the pepper spray,” said police spokesman Sgt. Andy Hill, adding that the Phoenix Fire Department was called to the scene to treat the girl. “I am told she was released and was expected to be OK.”

Phoenix police said Saturday night that five people were arrested during the protest and taken to Maricopa County Jail. Four were booked on suspicion of aggravated assault on police. The other faces disorderly conduct and resisting arrest charges.

Critics have accused deputies working in Arpaio’s immigration efforts of racial profiling, which the sheriff denies. He says his deputies approach people when they have probable cause to believe they had committed crimes.

Ten months ago, Arpaio learned he was under investigation by the U.S. Justice Department for alleged discrimination and unconstitutional searches.

Arpaio’s power to make federal immigration arrests was stripped away three months ago by officials in Washington, but he continues his immigration efforts through the enforcement of two state laws.



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