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‘Myst’ added to MoMA exhibit

Mead brothers produced innovative video game

New York’s Museum of Modern Art has added Cyan Worlds’ groundbreaking game “Myst” to a collection of significant, artistic video games.

The MoMA game collection, at www.moma.org, is the start of an evolving exhibit expected to grow to at least 40 major video games.

The initial list of 14 includes some games that became widely known, including Pac-Man, Tetris, The Sims and SimCity 2000.

“Myst” was released in 1993, produced by Mead-based Cyan Worlds. The MoMA listing recognizes brothers Rand Miller, 53, and Robyn Miller, 46, as the game’s primary creators.

Later versions of the “Myst” franchise included Riven, realMyst, Myst V: End of Ages, and Myst Online: Uru Live.

MoMA said it will install the 14 games for a public exhibit in March. Some of the games will be installed in interactive mode, allowing visitors to experience them firsthand.

“Robyn and I were really excited and tickled to hear ‘Myst’ was chosen by MoMA,” said Rand Miller, the CEO of Cyan Worlds.

Robyn Miller played a key role in the first “Myst” product. Since then he’s left the company and is an independent filmmaker.

“Myst” drew worldwide attention because it allowed players to explore and find solutions in a world of challenges and puzzles. It drew praise for drastically breaking from the style of games where one destroys orcs, kills enemies or takes over territory.

This marks the second time this year “Myst” was chosen for a major museum exhibit: The Smithsonian Museum compiled a traveling exhibit called The Art of Videogames, which included “Myst” among its 80 games.

The Smithsonian collection, which included Donkey Kong, Space Invaders and other arcade favorites, was determined by popular votes.

In contrast, “the MoMA collection was based on aesthetics,” Rand Miller said, “and that makes it a bit more satisfying.”

Cyan Worlds employs 10 people. The company has created iPad and iPhone versions of “Myst” and is preparing to release an iOS version of Riven, considered the sequel to “Myst.”



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