March 9, 2013 in Nation/World

Chavez lauded by loyal Maduro

Late Venezuelan leader likened to Simon Bolivar
Vivian Sequera Associated Press
 
Associated Press photo

Venezuelan government officials join hands over the flag-draped casket of Venezuela’s late president, Hugo Chavez, on Friday.
(Full-size photo)(All photos)

CARACAS, Venezuela – Hugo Chavez was lauded as a modern-day reincarnation of Latin American liberator Simon Bolivar at a fiery, foot-stomping state funeral Friday, hours before his handpicked successor was sworn in as acting president over the fierce objections of the opposition.

Nicolas Maduro took the oath of office in the National Assembly before ruling party legislators, dignitaries and a boisterous crowd of sympathizers that chanted “Chavez lives! Maduro carries on!” Holding up a tiny blue-bound booklet of Venezuela’s 1999 constitution in his right hand, Maduro pledged his “most absolute loyalty” to Chavez.

He broke into tears as he spoke of his mentor during a strident acceptance speech that included numerous attacks on the United States, capitalist elites and the international media.

Maduro also claimed the allegiance of Venezuela’s army, calling it “the armed forces of Chavez” as he pumped his fist in the air, a gesture that was reciprocated by the defense minister watching from the gallery. Critics have voiced increasing concern about the overt support the military has shown to the ruling party since Chavez’s death despite a ban on the army’s participation in politics.

The opposition largely boycotted the swearing-in, calling it unconstitutional. Henrique Capriles, Maduro’s likely opponent in presidential election that must be called within 30 days, spoke condescendingly of the former bus driver and union leader, referring to him as “boy” and accusing him of “shamelessly” lying to the country.

At Chavez’s state funeral earlier in the day, Maduro stood before an assemblage of presidents, princes and left-wing glitterati, speaking in a booming voice over the flag-draped casket in a ceremony that at times smacked of a political rally.

“Here we are, Comandante, your men, on their feet,” Maduro shouted, government officials rising behind him. “All your men and women … loyal until beyond death.”

The funeral began with Venezuela’s national youth orchestra singing the national anthem, led by famed conductor Gustavo Dudamel. A government-allied congressman later belted out cowboy songs from Chavez’s native Barinas state.

In the funeral hall, more than 30 political leaders including Cuba’s Raul Castro, Spanish Crown Prince Felipe de Borbon, and Iran’s Mahmoud Ahmadinejad stood at attention before Chavez’s flag-draped coffin, which was closed for the ceremony.

Maduro said that no Venezuelan leader, even Bolivar, who died in exile, faced and overcame such treachery and opposition as Chavez, who succumbed to cancer Tuesday at age 58. “Here you are, unconquered, pure, transparent, unique, true and always alive,” Maduro shouted as many in attendance cried.

Despite the blustery language of his speech and the expulsion on Tuesday of two U.S. military attaches on suspicion of spying, Maduro made a point of welcoming the U.S. delegation led by Rep. Gregory Meeks, a New York Democrat, and former Rep. William Delahunt, a Democrat from Massachusetts.

State Department officials have voiced hope that Maduro will prove a more pragmatic leader than the often bombastic Chavez, assuming he wins a full term.

Television cameras captured Hollywood star Sean Penn at the funeral, while the Rev. Jesse Jackson preached rapprochement between his country and Venezuela.

“We pray to God today that you will heal the breach between the U.S. and Venezuela,” Jackson said. He later attended Maduro’s swearing-in.

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