November 10, 2013 in Nation/World

USS Gerald Ford, new American aircraft carrier, christened

Brock Vergakis Associated Press
 
Associated Press photo

President of Newport News Shipbuilding Matt Mulherin looks on as Susan Ford Bales christens the USS Gerald R. Ford at Newport News Shipbuilding on Saturday.
(Full-size photo)

NORFOLK, Va. – The Navy christened the USS Gerald Ford on Saturday with the traditional smashing of a bottle of sparkling wine across the bow of the ship – the most technologically advanced aircraft carrier the United States has built.

The Ford is the lead ship in the Navy’s next class of nuclear-powered aircraft carriers. It’s designed to get more fighter planes in the sky in less time and to be ready to incorporate unmanned aircraft into its air wing. It’s the first carrier redesign in four decades and is scheduled to join the fleet in 2016.

“She is truly a technological marvel,” Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert said in a webcast ceremony at the Newport News, Va., shipyard where the Ford is being built. “She will carry unmanned aircraft, joint strike fighters, and she will deploy lasers.”

Saturday’s christening was one part tribute to the future of naval warfare and one part tribute to the ship’s namesake, former President Gerald R. Ford. Ford was a lieutenant commander aboard an aircraft carrier during World War II and frequently spoke fondly of his time in the Navy.

Ford’s daughter, Susan Ford Bales, is the ship’s sponsor and had the duty of smashing the wine bottle into the ship.

The Ford – with a new nuclear power plant, electromagnetic catapults and an enhanced 5-acre flight deck – will leave dry dock and head to a pier at Newport News Shipbuilding next week. The Navy says construction on the ship is about 70 percent complete and will finish up in 2015. It will then undergo a series of sea trials before it is commissioned and becomes operational.

Until then, the Navy will be down to a 10-carrier fleet following the USS Enterprise’s deactivation last year.

The Ford is about $2 billion over budget and is about 70 percent complete. The cost overruns are eating into the aircraft carrier’s projected savings. The aircraft carrier was designed to operate with fewer crew members, which is expected to save $4 billion over the ship’s 50-year life span.

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