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Spokane Indians’ Avista Stadium receives high marks from Stadium Journey

UPDATED: Wed., Jan. 24, 2018, 4:37 p.m.

Spokane’s Avista Stadium, seen in this Sept. 3, 2017 file photo, was listed at No. 31 among Stadium Journey’s top 100 stadium experiences in the United States and Canada for 2017. (James Snook / Special to The Spokesman-Review)
Spokane’s Avista Stadium, seen in this Sept. 3, 2017 file photo, was listed at No. 31 among Stadium Journey’s top 100 stadium experiences in the United States and Canada for 2017. (James Snook / Special to The Spokesman-Review)

Avista Stadium, home to the Spokane Indians, was listed at No. 31 among Stadium Journey’s top 100 stadium experiences in the United States and Canada for 2017, the Indians announced Tuesday.

The Indians, of the short-season Class A Northwest League, received the second-highest ranking among minor league teams, behind the Class A Fort Wayne (Indiana) Tincaps’ Parkview Field (No. 29).

Stadium Journey is a travel magazine for sports fans.

Avista Stadium, celebrating its 60th anniversary, was built in 1958 as a home for the Los Angeles Dodgers’ Triple-A team after the Dodgers relocated from Brooklyn.

Avista Stadium underwent major renovations in 2013, including concessions facilities and a new team store. In 2014, nearly 300 parking spaces were added.

“When I’m asked what my favorite stadium is, I always state Avista Stadium as one of my two favorite minor league stadiums,” Stadium Journey’s Meg Minard said. “I’d recommend catching a game at Avista Stadium if you want to enjoy a great evening out at a ballpark.”



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