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Sunday, May 31, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Outdoors blog

Officer looking to kill second wolf in the Wedge

In 2008, the gray wolf, which was re-introduced to the northern Rockies in 1995, flipflopped off and back on the Endangered Species list, endured a brief hunting season in Wyoming, negotiated the Snake River to take up residence in Oregon and had its first comfirmed litter of pups in Washington since the 1930s.  (Associated Press / The Spokesman-Review)
In 2008, the gray wolf, which was re-introduced to the northern Rockies in 1995, flipflopped off and back on the Endangered Species list, endured a brief hunting season in Wyoming, negotiated the Snake River to take up residence in Oregon and had its first comfirmed litter of pups in Washington since the 1930s. (Associated Press / The Spokesman-Review)

ENDANGERED SPECIES -- Washington Fish and Wildlife officials this morning said an enforcement officer from out of the region continues to hunt for a second wolf to kill from the Wedge Pack after he shot a female wolf Tuesday.

The wolves are thought to be culpable in several attacks on Diamond M Ranch cattle near Laurier, Wash., since mid-July.

Agency officials from Olympia today asked that I remove a photo used with my blog posted Tuesday night because it showed a state biologist carrying a male wolf that had been caught, tranquilized, radio-collared and released.  In their request they pointed out:

  • The biologist who's been live-trapping wolves for tagging and monitoring is not involved in the current operation to kill livestock-attacking wolves.
  • The male wolf that was collared with a GPS tracking device is considered to be the pack's alpha male and is not being targeted for lethal removal.

However, the GPS-collared male likely is giving the officer clues to the whereabouts of the rest of the pack.

Officials said an unidentified officer from out of the region was brought in because they want to avoid possible retribution by wolf zealots who might target -- with harassment or violence -- the man assigned to do the dirty work of enforcing the state's wolf management plan. 



Rich Landers
Rich Landers joined The Spokesman-Review in 1977. He is the Outdoors editor for the Sports Department writing and photographing stories about hiking, hunting, fishing, boating, conservation, nature and wildlife and related topics.

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