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Sunday, November 17, 2019  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Meat Doesn’t Have To Make The Meal

Today is the Great American Meatout, and its sponsors hope you’ll kick the meat habit at least for a day.

The Meatout was launched in 1985 by public health, environment and animal protection advocates, who say that removing meat from your daily diet can be beneficial to your health.

They point to studies showing that the consumption of meat has been linked to higher rates of heart disease, stroke, cancer and other health problems.

They also claim that the demand for meat leads to environmental devastation, world hunger and animal abuse.

The Meatout is coordinated each year by FARM Farm Animal Reform Movement. For more information, contact FARM, P.O. Box 30654, Bethesda, MD 20824, or call (800)-MEATOUT.

Stroke prevention

Dr. Karen Stanek, director of St. Luke’s Rehabilitation Institute, will lead a discussion about strokes at St. Luke’s Medical Building March 28 from noon to 1:30 p.m.

Stanek will discuss the signs of strokes, the role family history plays in high blood pressure and heart disease, and prevention and treatment of strokes.

The cost is $5. Women’s Health Network and Health Access members attend free. Bring a snack or a sack lunch. To register, call 624-7770.

Walk for MS

The National Multiple Sclerosis Society’s MS Walk happens April 2 at 10 a.m. at the Intercollegiate Center for Nursing Education, 2917 W. Fort George Wright Drive.

Proceeds will benefit the Inland Northwest Chapter of the National MS Society. More than 1,800 local residents are afflicted with multiple sclerosis, a chronic disease that attacks the body’s nervous system. Money raised also funds continued research.

For information about registering, forming a team or sponsoring walkers, call the MS Society at 482-2022.

Cardiac health guide

A new government publication offering information on lowering blood cholesterol levels and improving cardiac health through diet is now available. “Step by Step: Eating to Lower Your High Blood Cholesterol” contains general rules for diet, physical activity and weight loss. It offers tips on adopting healthy eating habits, buying and preparing foods low in saturated fats and cholesterol, and maintaining diets at restaurants and social events.

The guide can be ordered by sending a check for $9.75 payable to Federal Reprints to Federal Reprints, P.O. Box 70268, Washington, DC 20024.

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