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Update spouse’s life insurance just in case

Kathy Mitchell And Marcy Sugar

Dear Annie: I am a newly married woman and am writing about my husband, who refuses to see a doctor for a potentially life-threatening issue. In fact, he refuses to see any doctor at all. I am not aware that he has any specific fear of doctors, so this puzzles me.

I believe my husband has severe sleep apnea. It began with a 20-pound weight gain and light snoring. It has graduated to my being punched and elbowed regularly, and he does what I call the “alligator death roll” all night. Not to mention, I don’t get much sleep because his snoring and breath holding cause him to wake up choking and coughing, sometimes until he vomits.

I know how dangerous this disorder can be if it remains untreated. How can I get my husband to understand the risk?

To top it all off, he is a smoker and clearly has the beginnings of emphysema. His hearing is “HUH?” – horrible – and his vision borders on legally blind. We have excellent private health insurance, which is a blessing, and he has no excuse not to seek medical help.

I am 40 and he is 51. I did not marry the love of my life to lose him because he is a stubborn mule. While my main concern is his well-being, this is taking its toll on our marriage, as well. He reads your column faithfully every morning. Maybe if he sees it in writing, he won’t feel like I’m mothering him. – Sleepless in Salem

Dear Sleepless: Your husband isn’t simply stubborn. He’s scared to death and probably a little depressed, as well. He thinks a trip to the doctor will confirm his worst fears. But a diagnosis is not a death sentence, and sleep apnea can be treated successfully (although if he continues to smoke, it will be harder). Without treatment, respiratory illnesses can create tremendous suffering for both of you.

Since you cannot force him to be courageous enough to face his fears, we suggest you sleep in another room and make sure his life insurance is paid up.

Dear Annie: I am currently interviewing for a position with several different companies in different industries.

I have diagnosed learning disabilities and want to know when the correct time is to mention my disabilities to the interviewer. – Disabled But Not Disqualified

Dear DBND: You are not legally required to disclose your disability at the interview or any other time. And the interviewer is not permitted to ask. If you are qualified for the job and can do the work, your disability should not be an issue, so don’t make it one.

Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar are longtime editors of the Ann Landers column.
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