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Saturday, July 20, 2019  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Sports >  Outdoors

Mica Peak trail work continues

Washington Trail Association volunteers take in the view from Mica Peak on Sunday June 3, 2018. The peak is nearly as tall as Mount Spokane and features views of the Palouse, Spokane Valley and the Saltese Flats. Washington Trail Association volunteers have started building single-track trails that will eventually connect several old logging roads on Mica Peak. (Eli Francovich / The Spokesman-Review)
Washington Trail Association volunteers take in the view from Mica Peak on Sunday June 3, 2018. The peak is nearly as tall as Mount Spokane and features views of the Palouse, Spokane Valley and the Saltese Flats. Washington Trail Association volunteers have started building single-track trails that will eventually connect several old logging roads on Mica Peak. (Eli Francovich / The Spokesman-Review)

A new trail system on Mica Peak continues to take shape this summer thanks to the sweat equity of volunteers

“That trail, it’s going to be a stunner when its done,” said Paul Knowles, the Spokane County parks planner.

The Washington Trail Association is about 2/3 done with its section, he said. Meanwhile, the Evergreen East mountain biking club is about 1/3 of the way done completing a single-track bike trail. The volunteers started building trails last summer near the top of Mica Peak.

Mica Peak tops out at 5,209 feet and provides a unique vantage point on the Spokane area. The true summit of the mountain is owned by the Federal Aviation Administration and is not open to the public.

The trailwork is the culmination of years of planning and purchasing. Spokane County purchased the 911 acres in 2013 for $1.7 million. Shortly after the purchase, a trail plan was developed. Ultimately the trail plan calls for 14 miles of trail, Knowles said.

But it’s not done yet. Recently some hikers have called the county complaining that the trails aren’t marked, or start too low on the mountain, Knowles said. He reminds eager recreationists to be patient.

“It’s a work in progress,” he said.

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