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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Avoid falling for a scam call, text, or email

Keep your personal information safe.

 (Courtesy STCU)
(Courtesy STCU)
Sponsored content provided by STCU

Scammers and fraudsters can get creative when they’re trying to get ahold of your personal information. STCU wants to make sure that information stays safe and secure.

Here are a few ways scammers and fraudsters may try to trick you:

  • Use calls, voicemails, and texts to impersonate your bank or other government officials.
  • Send scam texts that contain a link that will take you to a website that looks legitimate. 
  • Spoof phone numbers to make calls and texts looking like they’re actually coming from your bank or another local number.
  • Send scam emails that look like they’re from companies you might use. Examples of this are Amazon and Norton. These emails sometimes state something like “Your delivery has been delayed” and contain a link to click on.
  • These are some signs something might be a scam attempt:

    • Things need to happen urgently.
    • There’s pushback when you try to verify details on your own
    • The scammer requests to send you money somewhere else (via wire transfer, money order or gift card purchases) to “protect it.”
    • The scammer requests you to mail a package with cash in it.
    • They ask for PIN numbers or online banking login credentials.
    • Emails contain spelling, grammar, or general English language errors.
    • Emails that come from an address that doesn’t appear to be associated with the company that the email is supposedly from.
    • Here are ways you can protect yourself:

      • Be skeptical, very skeptical.
      • If something seems like it’s too good to be true, it probably is.
      • Monitor your accounts regularly.
      • Protect your information and never give out your account or card numbers unless it’s absolutely necessary.
      • Never give out your online banking login credentials.
      • Slow down and determine whether the message is legitimate.
      • Never click on a link or reply until you’ve verified its source.
      • This is what you can do if you think you’ve become a victim to a scam:

        • Discontinue contact with whomever you’re dealing with and contact your bank immediately through a safe and known method. That includes calling a verified customer service phone number or going into a branch.
        • You can learn more about keeping your personal information safe by attending one of STCU’s virtual workshops or by clicking or watching the below video.

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