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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Shawn Vestal
COLUMNIST
Shawn Vestal shawnv@spokesman.com (509) 459-5431

Shawn Vestal joined The Spokesman-Review in 1999. He currently is a columnist for the City Desk.


Most Recent Stories

Dec. 22, 2020, 1:32 p.m.
Due to a reporting error, Shawn Vestal's column in the Sunday Spokesman-Review incorrectly referred to the location of a wedding that has been linked to COVID-19 outbreaks. The wedding was in rural Adams County.

Dec. 20, 2020, 6 a.m.
Surely, the bride and groom – and the families of the bride and groom and all the people who wanted to celebrate their joyous union – convinced themselves they were doing the right thing.

Dec. 17, 2020, 12:30 p.m.
John Hagney was watching CNN last week when he saw a familiar face.

Dec. 16, 2020, 5 a.m.
When the name of George Wright comes down off that road at last, it will be replaced with one that deserves to be there.

Dec. 13, 2020, 5 a.m.
In September 1918, a flu pandemic arrived in Philadelphia.

Dec. 6, 2020, 5 a.m.
Seven years ago, a retired judge, former federal prosecutor and defense attorney produced a report, based on volumes of data and lots of citizen input, recommending ways we could improve our criminal justice system.

Dec. 6, 2020, 4 a.m.
It thrives inside of us, miniscule and hidden, and travels to others on invisible pathways.

Dec. 4, 2020, 5 a.m.
I know a place you can get a real good chicken sandwich on Division Street.

Dec. 2, 2020, 5 a.m.
Has Loren Culp conceded yet?

Nov. 29, 2020, 5 a.m.
Dr. Francisco Velázquez – the hastily drafted interim health officer of the Spokane Regional Health District – showed up the day before Thanksgiving at his third public press conference, 25 days into the worst month of the pandemic and 16 days into his thankless new job.

News >  Spokane
Nov. 29, 2020, 4 a.m.
It starts with the standard 6 feet and grows to include distances impossible to measure.

Nov. 28, 2020, 2:25 p.m.
The mayor has turned the whole city NIMBY.

Nov. 22, 2020, 4 a.m.
In the second installment of this series of highly personal essays by photojournalist Brian Plonka and columnist Shawn Vestal, we consider the mask, and what it tells us about the person wearing it.

Nov. 15, 2020, 4 a.m.
Calpurnia pleaded with Caesar not to go to the Senate on that fateful March day.

Nov. 1, 2020, 3:30 a.m.
Another winter has arrived and with it, another game of catch-up in sheltering the homeless.

Oct. 30, 2020, 3:18 p.m.
“The people of this state do not yield their sovereignty to the agencies that serve them. The people, in delegating authority, do not give their public servants the right to decide what is good for the people to know and what is not good for them to know. The people insist on remaining informed so that they may maintain control over the instruments that they have created.”

Oct. 29, 2020, 1:43 p.m.
It’s time to rename the Panhandle Board of Health.

Oct. 26, 2020, 4:55 p.m.
Occasionally, I will write something so outrageously offensive to some readers that they reach out to let me know they are canceling their subscriptions.

Oct. 25, 2020, 4 a.m.
When Maya Zeller was beginning her graduate  work as a poetry student in Eastern Washington University’s MFA program in 2005, she attended a student reading where she saw Jess Walter in the crowd.

Oct. 22, 2020, 1:42 p.m.
On July 17, a group of about 30 anti-maskers gathered on the sidewalk outside the home of our county’s public health officer, Dr. Bob Lutz.

Oct. 21, 2020, 3:30 a.m.
Do you believe global warming is happening?

Oct. 14, 2020, 3:30 p.m.
On a hot June night in 2016, something woke Anne Walter from her sleep.

Oct. 9, 2020, 5 a.m.
In a moment when thousands of Spokane County residents have lost their jobs – and with cuts looming at Eastern Washington University – the wildly prosperous failure of former EWU President Mary Cullinan is a strange story, indeed.

Oct. 7, 2020, 5 a.m.
Every year, tax dodgers and cheats cost the U.S. Treasury more than $381 billion, according to one estimate.

Oct. 4, 2020, 5 a.m.
Margo Hill has been attending the Life Center Church with her family for years.