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Marketing >  EVERCANNABIS

Yogastey focuses on consistent CBD

Anna Wyatt created Yogastey, a brand of CBD products.  (Photos courtesy Yogastey)
Anna Wyatt created Yogastey, a brand of CBD products. (Photos courtesy Yogastey)
By Dan Webster EVERCANNABIS Correspondent

One of the traditional facets of modern business is the so-called middleman. You know, the entity that stands between the producer of a product and those who seek to purchase said product.

Anna Wyatt thinks she has a better idea.

“We really want to get straight to the people,” Wyatt said. And, she adds, experience has taught her that Spokane-area consumers are supportive of that attitude as well.

“They’d really rather go to a local business and buy local than go to Amazon or Walmart,” she said.

Wyatt is the producer behind a CBD line produced under the Yogastey brand (yogasteycbd.com). Unlike cannabis products with the psychoactive element tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) that can only be sold at licensed Washington cannabis retailers, CBD products can be sold just about anywhere.

But that widespread availability has led to unreliable or even counterfeit CBD.

Wyatt was the general manager of the Sativa Sisters retail cannabis store in Clarkston in late 2017 when she began receiving complaints from customers who purchased CBD “about inconsistency in its effects.”

Testing the various products, she says, proved revealing.

“About 90 percent of the products that they were carrying at that time came back either with no CBD or not even close to what they were saying,” she said.

So she had an idea: Why depend on others?

“There’s obviously a market for a credible, quality CBD brand that can stand behind what its claims are,” she says.

Wyatt attracted an investor, quit her job – “a big risk,” she said – and Yogastey was born. Two years ago Wyatt moved to Spokane. Yogastey is now based out of Millwood in the Spokane Valley.

“I kind of run the joint. I have one investor. I make, test and market. I do everything … so, I don’t know if there’s a title for that,” she said.

Yogastey products are available through the company website, at the Amsterdam Coffee Club, 10525 E. Trent Ave., and until October, at two area farmers markets: Wednesdays at the Millwood Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m. in Millwood Park; and Thursdays at the South Perry Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m.

It’s at those two public markets that you’ll be able to meet Wyatt in person, in her marketing guise, answering whatever questions you might want to ask. One might be, what are your most popular products?

Wyatt cites three:

CBD Drops: “Our biggest seller,” she said. Launched this February, the drops come in three strengths: 100 milligrams, 500 milligrams and 1,500 milligrams. Wyatt says the tincture is “really unique. Your pets can take it, too.”

CBD Salve: Made from a blend of olive oil, beeswax, vitamin E oil, grapefruit seed oil, essential oil and CBD, the 250-milligram salve is, Wyatt says, for anyone “who has a general ache or pain. You just apply when needed.”

Bath Bombs: Made from a variety of sources, including citric acid and coconut oil, these are easy to use: “Drop bath bomb into a warm bath. Soak and relax.”

As with most cannabis products, including CBDs, research on effects has been slow to develop.

“CBDs are most notably known for inflammation and pain,” Wyatt said. “But the more that CBDs are on the market, it’s allowed more research. And there are tons of claims about what CBD can help you with.”

Wyatt, 32, has been a consumer herself, she says, “for a large chunk of my life.” And that makes her committed to sharing what she knows with others – and, she adds, doing so up close and personal.

“Our intent is to solidify the Yogastey brand and to be able to stand behind what we make and honor everything that’s on that label,” she says. “That’s what the customer wants. They want to know that if they have an issue that we’re going to stand behind it.”

In other words, no middleman need apply.

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