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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Kamilah Boone

This individual is no longer an employee with The Spokesman-Review.

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News >  Features

CREATE seeking artwork

CREATE invites artists to submit work for its second annual "Go with the Flow" exhibit. "Rivers" is this year's theme; works should be inspired by images or impressions of flowing waters. Up to two pieces in any medium are welcome. Entry fee is $2 per artist.
News >  Features

ChalkArtWalk contest scheduled in Hillyard

The eighth annual ChalkArtWalk contest will be Saturday on the sidewalks of the Hillyard Historic Business District. The free event runs from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. This year's theme is "Dream." A basic selection of chalk is provided free at the registration booth, but participants are encouraged to bring their own chalk if they want a greater variety of colors. Oil-based pastels are not permitted.
News >  Features

Western Writers plan June convention

Western Writers of America is hosting a convention June 14 through 18 at the Mirabeau Park Hotel in Spokane Valley. The complete convention package is $205 for members and $215 for nonmembers, and includes all panels, two business breakfasts, awards luncheon, Spur banquet, Books In Motion and Arbor Crest winery tour and Homestead Auction. The registration fee increases on Friday. The group was founded to promote the literature of the American West, but has expanded to include historians and other nonfiction authors, young adult and romance writers, and writers interested in regional history.

News >  Features

Artists opening studios for public tours

North Country Artist Trails, a program of the Colville Arts Foundation, invites the public to tour artists' studios, gardens and galleries throughout Northeastern Washington beginning Memorial Day weekend and throughout the summer season. A variety of artists are participating, including potters, sculptors, metal workers, painters and bead workers. Although participants have different hours, all will open their studios May 27-30, July 29-31 and Aug. 26-28.
News >  Features

New work to be unveiled at Art Works

Artwork donated to the Rock Creek Alliance by artists Barbara Janusz and Gabe Gabel will be unveiled Friday from 5 to 8 p.m. at Art Works Gallery, 214 N. First Ave. in Sandpoint. Janusz's painting of Rock Creek Falls and Gabel's bronze moose sculpture were donated as part of a fund-raising effort to stop the development of the proposed Rock Creek mine, upstream from Lake Pend Oreille in the Cabinet Mountains Wilderness Area. The works will be raffled at the alliance's annual meeting later this summer. Raffle tickets will be available at Friday's reception; tickets are $5 each or three for $10. Hors d'oeuvres and wine also will be available.
News >  Idaho

Dave Traner ‘loved life, lived it to the fullest’

Perhaps the best way to sum up Dave Traner's life is to look at the three posters still hanging in his classroom. The first reads "You only live once, but if you live right once is enough." The second is "I am not an ordinary person," and the third says "Take time to do the things that really make you happy." Traner, a science teacher at Mead Middle School for 15 years, died Oct. 7 from injuries suffered in a car accident east of Missoula. He was 55.
News >  Voices

Mead teacher ‘loved life, lived it to the fullest’

Perhaps the best way to sum up David Traner's life is to look at the three posters still hanging in his classroom. The first reads, "You only live once, but if you live right once is enough." The second is, "I am not an ordinary person," and the third says, "Take time to do the things that really make you happy." Traner, a science teacher at Mead Middle School for 15 years, died Oct. 7 from injuries suffered in a car accident east of Missoula. He was 55.
News >  Voices

Frank Demaray left legacy of helping family, others

The only visible difference between Frank Demaray and his identical twin, Ed, was their height. "My grandfather used to say that he made up for being born second by being a little bit taller than his brother," said Marcia Charlton, Frank's granddaughter.
News >  Voices

Silvio DeCaro remembered as family man, ‘brilliant tailor’

For Silvio DeCaro, tailoring was much more than measuring and sewing. It was an art. "What set him apart was that he was technically a brilliant tailor and he always wanted to learn new things," said his son, Gian DeCaro. "A lot of guys stop learning at a certain point in their life. He used to say when you're green you grow and when you're ripe you rot."

More Stories By Kamilah Boone