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Dorothy Dean presents: For Mother’s Day, a twist on diner staple French toast

UPDATED: Mon., May 4, 2020

By Audrey Alfaro For The Spokesman-Review

This Mother’s Day, let Mom sleep in and surprise her with the best kind of breakfast there is: one made by someone other than herself. (And don’t forget to do the dishes, too!)

Let the enticing aromas of French toast be the sweet start to her special day. Seriously, who wouldn’t want to wake up to a platter full of golden French toast drizzled with glistening warm syrup? Umm … yes, please.

This diner staple is typically made with slices of bread dipped in a seasoned mixture of milk and eggs. However, this recipe adds a secret ingredient – well, not so secret anymore: flour. The flour thickens the mixture, creating more of a batter that better coats the bread. It also ensures your French toast will be fluffy, not eggy or soggy.

This French toast is pan fried in a mixture of butter and oil, which creates a golden, tender-crisp crust that gives way to a luscious interior, flavored with hints of cinnamon and vanilla, making it absolutely irresistible.

Many types of bread can be used for French toast: brioche, challah, French, Texas toast, sweet Hawaiian or even a variety of cinnamon swirl or raisin bread. Just be sure the slices are cut thick, as thin slices tend to fall apart and get mushy.

This is a great recipe to get the kiddos involved with, too. Plus, they’ll love surprising Mom with breakfast they helped make, and everyone will enjoy choosing their toppings.

I mean, don’t get me wrong, French toast and syrup is a beautiful thing, but jazzed up with fresh berries, powdered sugar, sliced almonds, whipped cream, bacon or even Nutella – this French toast is next-level delicious.

And French toast pairs well with coffee; however, unless you’re spiking mom’s, mimosas are a must.

French Toast

Adapted from allrecipes.com.

1/4 cup all-purpose flour

1 cup milk

3 eggs

1 pinch salt

1 pinch nutmeg

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 tablespoon white sugar

6 thick slices bread (brioche, challah, French or Texas toast)

2 tablespoons unsalted butter, or more if needed

2 tablespoons cooking oil, or more if needed

Optional toppings: syrup, butter, powdered sugar, fresh berries, whipped cream

In a shallow dish, such as a pie plate, whisk together the flour and milk. (It won’t be completely smooth, and that’s OK.) Add in the eggs, salt, nutmeg, cinnamon, vanilla and sugar and whisk until combined.

Preheat oven to 250 degrees and place a baking sheet topped with a wire rack inside an oven.

In a large skillet or griddle, add 2 tablespoons of butter and 2 tablespoons of oil and heat over medium heat.

Working in batches, dip the bread in the egg mixture, turning to fully saturate, and add to the hot skillet to cook until golden, about 3 minutes per side, adding more butter and oil as needed. Transfer the cooked French toast to a wire rack in the oven to keep them warm until serving.

Serve with syrup and/or desired toppings.

Audrey Alfaro can be reached at spoonandswallow@yahoo.com.

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