Arrow-right Camera

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Monday, December 9, 2019  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Partly Cloudy Night 31° Partly Cloudy

Election Center

Glenn Rohrer

A candidate for State Senator, Republican Primary, Idaho Legislative District 1 in the 2016 Idaho Primary, May 17

Party: Republican

City: Priest River, Idaho

A retired industrial engineer and plant manager and a retired Air National Guard major, Rohrer is a former planning and zoning administrator for the city of Priest River. Rohrer opposes the uniform child support enforcement bill whose failure forced a special session of the Legislature in 2005; he called the day an amended version of the bill passed “a sad day for freedom in Idaho.” He also wants to cut taxes and regulations and opposes allowing state parks to accept corporate sponsorships for projects within parks, which the Legislature has approved. He promotes a "Retire Shawn Keough" website that claims incumbent Keough isn't really a Republican, though District 1 voters have elected her as a Republican 10 times since 1996.

Contact information


Election results

Candidate Votes Pct
Shawn Keough (R) 1,279 58.59 %
Glenn Rohrer (R) 904 41.41 %

Details & headlines >>

Competitors

Shawn Keough

Republican

Related coverage



Of District 1 legislative races, the ‘American Redoubt’ and politics in North Idaho…

In Idaho’s northernmost legislative district, Republican Party politics has been pulled farther to the right in recent years with the rise of the tea party. But now a new element is pushing the party farther still: the arrival of conservative Christian “preppers” fleeing more populated states, who see the region as a “redoubt” – a place to…


Redoubt movement helps push North Idaho politics to extreme right

In Idaho’s northernmost legislative district, Republican Party politics has been pulled farther to the right in recent years with the rise of the tea party. But now a new element is pushing the party farther still: the arrival of conservative Christian “preppers” fleeing more-populated states, who see the region as a “redoubt” – a place to settle and defend themselves when the whole country goes bad.