Arrow-right Camera

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Clear Night 33° Clear
News >  Spokane

100 years ago in Spokane: City rejects census count that trims population by 200

UPDATED: Tue., May 12, 2020

Spokane’s Chamber of Commerce announced a “determined effort” to find at least 200 residents who could show that they were uncounted in the 1910 Census numbers, which showed a drop of about 198 from the 1910 population, the Spokane Daily Chronicle reported on May 12, 1920. (S-R archives)
Spokane’s Chamber of Commerce announced a “determined effort” to find at least 200 residents who could show that they were uncounted in the 1910 Census numbers, which showed a drop of about 198 from the 1910 population, the Spokane Daily Chronicle reported on May 12, 1920. (S-R archives)

Spokane still was unwilling to accept the U.S. Census Bureau’s figures which showed a decrease in population from 1910 to 1920.

In fact, the city’s Chamber of Commerce announced a “determined effort” to find at least 200 residents who could show that they were uncounted in the census numbers, which showed a drop of about 198 from the 1910 population.

This drive was actually done in cooperation with the Census Bureau, which said it would would permit such additions if they could be proven.

In the end, the Chamber’s drive proved successful. The final census number would eventually be revised upward by 233, to 104,437, which put it 37 over the 1910 number.

Meanwhile, multiple speakers at a recent Chamber of Commerce meeting cited statistics, including school enrollment figures and real estate development, which they believed showed clear evidence of substantial growth.

A real estate man said he studied the statistics and came to the conclusion that Spokane had added 12,000 to 15,000 new housing units over the last decade.

From the epidemic beat: Word arrived from Nenana, Alaska, of a terrifying flu scourge. A total of 40 residents had already died. The town’s telegraph office announced the grim news when it finally reopened after a shutdown.

The disease had apparently spread to Fairbanks, as well. That city reported 12 deaths, but only two new cases.

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

Local journalism is essential.

Give directly to The Spokesman-Review's Northwest Passages community forums series -- which helps to offset the costs of several reporter and editor positions at the newspaper -- by using the easy options below. Gifts processed in this system are not tax deductible, but are predominately used to help meet the local financial requirements needed to receive national matching-grant funds.

Subscribe to the Coronavirus newsletter

Get the day’s latest Coronavirus news delivered to your inbox by subscribing to our newsletter.


Annual health and dental insurance enrollment period open now

 (Courtesy Washington Healthplanfinder)
Sponsored

2020 has been a stressful year for myriad reasons.